ALAA Roots — An Unofficial Site

September 25, 2002

2002.09.19: ALAA Delegate Council Bulletin #85

[Download .pdf version: dcb85]

ALAA Delegate Council Bulletin #85

Thursday, September 19, 2002, 6:30 p.m. sharp

  • Location: 568 Broadway, Rm. 702A (N/R to Prince, B/D/F/Q to Broadway-Lafayette, 6 to Spring).
  • Estimated length: Approximately 2 hours.
  • All ALAA members welcome (only elected representatives may vote).
  • Free pizza/soda.

•TO PROVIDE PROPER NOTICE TO ALL MEMBERS,  PLEASE SUBMIT ADDITIONAL AGENDA ITEMS IN ADVANCE.

Proposed Agenda

1.         Minutes.

2.      LAS Criminal Budget (1 hr.)

2.1.      City contract status.

2.2.      CAB staffing.

2.3.      CDD staffing.  Motion (Executive Board): Approve the position presented by the EB to management that CDD staff attorney hiring should not exceed 66 (except for 3 additional current diversity candidates) until and unless warranted by future experience; and (2) Additional CDD supervision should be achieved through redeployment of existing supervisors, not through hiring new supervisors.[1]

3.      Collective Bargaining (20 min).

3.1.      ADA comparability.[2]

3.2.      Membership materials. Sept. 17 EB decision to distribute to all members: (1) Summary of changes in past two contracts; (2) Membership contract survey.

4.      Internal (45 min).

4.1.      Bylaw revision. Unanimously recommended by the EB (redlined version attached).

4.2.      Proposed election timetable. Unanimous EB proposed timetable for November 21, 2002 Union elections (below).

4.3.      Election Committee. Selection of ALAA Election Committee.

4.4. Membership status for terminated attorneys.

4.5.      PRDU representation. PRDU request, due to office move, for transfer from jurisdiction of CAB VP to that of CDD-Bk V.P.

5.      Political Action (5 min.).

6.      Adjournment.

Proposed 2002 ALAA Election Timetable
Date Action Bylaw Reference
Sept. 19 DC vote on proposed bylaw amendments Art. IX (“These bylaws may be amended by a majority vote of the members, after thirty (30) days notice of the proposed amendment, or by a majority vote of the DC, after the proposed amendment is noticed on the agenda of two (2) consecutive DC meetings.”)
Sept. 19 Formation of Election Committee (EC) by DC Art. VIII, Sec. 4.1
Sept 30 Beginning of 30-day nomination period Art. IV, Sec. 6.1; Art. VIII, Sec. 4.2
Oct. 30 Membership meeting to close 30-day nomination period
By Nov. 6 Election notice (15 days prior to election) Art. IV, Sec. 6.1; Art. VIII, Sec. 4.3
Nov. 21 Office balloting (<7 days after close of nominations)
Dec. 17 Post-election membership meeting to ratify Election Committee report and install officers Proposed Art. VIII, Sec. 8.8 (“Within 30 days of a general election, there shall be a membership meeting at which the elections committee shall give its report on the election results and the elected officers and EB members shall be installed. Any timely protest to the election could be discussed at this meeting, but shall only be voted on by the membership at a subsequent meeting or other form of vote, held within 30 days thereafter.”)

Minutes of Special ALAA Delegate Council

On LAS Criminal Funding-July 23, 2002

Attendance

Citywide Officers: Letwin (President), Albro (Secy-Treasurer), Hitchcock (Recording Secretary)

CAB: Harpaz (VP), Blum (Alt. VP), Hopkirk, Peters, Sender, Ginsburg (PRP)

CDD-Bx: Gurwitch (Alt. VP and BxB), Roman (BxA), Abbandando and Bomba (BxC)

CDD-Bk: Zuss (VP), Korotzer (Alt. VP and Bk2), Ritter and Flanders (Bk3)

CDD-Manhattan: Wright (VP), Mulligan (Alt. VP), Nevins (M1), Friedman (M2), Vasquez (M3), Dvorchak and Fiellman (M4), Seeley and Soto (M5), Affler and Zablocki (M6), Wasserman (Spec. Lit)

CDD-Qns: Byrne (VP), Frederick and Knightly (Q3), Austin and Diflumeri (Q4)

Civil: Lacaprucia (Harlem)

CLO/Volunteer: Edwards (Alt. VP)

Counsel: Engelstein

1.      Overview.

The DC received detailed reports concerning the status of Legal Aid’s city criminal contract, including: (1) Negotiations with the Bloomberg administration; (2) Counsel’s view of Union/Society litigation challenging the city’s conduct prior to, during and since the 1994 strike; and (3) CAB/CDD staffing.

Following these reports, the DC voted as follows on the substantive motions below.

2.   Pending ALAA Litigation.

„By a vote of 19-11-4, the DC adopted a motion by Mulligan and Affler (2d) (CDD-Manhattan) to table the following motion by Byrne and Diflumeri (CDD-Qns): Condition settlement (not dismissal) of the Union’s litigation concerning the 1994 strike on management’s written assurance that additional staff (other than replacement of attrition) will not be hired until after staff attorney compensation is increased by more than 2.5%/year.

„By a vote of 19-12-2 (roll call below[3]), the DC adopted the following motion by Bomba (CDD-Bx) and Zuss (CDD-Bk): Authorize the ALAA Executive Board to decide settlement of the Union’s litigation concerning the 1994 strike, following negotiations with LAS management over allocation of additional city funds.

[In response to this motion, the EB informed management that, at least $2m/year of additional LAS city criminal funds should be reserved for staff attorney compensation increases, above and beyond the 2.5% already budgeted for that purpose.  Management replied  that it would lift the minimum compensation increase to 3%, and would negotiate over further compensation increases.

Following conclusion of negotiations between LAS and the city concerning the Society’s criminal contract, the EB authorized settlement of ALAA’s pending federal litigation as a condition of increased city funding.

3.   CDD/CAB Staffing.

„By a vote of 19-2-3, the DC adopted the following motion by Harpaz (CAB) and Ritter (CDD-Bk): Oppose involuntary transfers from CAB to CDD, and delegate to ALAA’s CAB representatives the decision about whether the Union authorizes voluntary CAB buyouts.

[Shortly thereafter, LAS management reduced its proposal for CAB staff attorney reductions to 14.  In response, the CAB members agreed to authorize voluntary buyouts.


[1]This proposal (Torres/Byrne) was passed at the Sept. 17 EB by a 9-1 vote. [For: Albro (Secy Treas.), Byrne (VP/CDD-Qns), Geltman (VP/CDD-Bx), Harpaz (VP/CAB), Hochberg (VP/JRD), Lundgren (VP/Volunteer), Torres (Sr. Attys), Wadia (Health Benefits), Zuss (VP/CDD-Bk); Against (in regard to the “66 number” limit): Wright (VP-CDD/Manhattan).]

This motion was preceded by the following two votes:

Motion (Zuss/Wright): Support immediate offers to 2-3 specific candidates of colorPassed: 8-2 [For: Albro (Secy Treas.), Harpaz (VP/CAB), Hitchcock (Rec.Secy), Hochberg (VP/JRD), Lundgren (VP/Volunteer), Torres (Sr. Attys), Wadia (Health Benefits), Wright (VP-CDD/Manhattan), Zuss (VP/CDD-Bk); Against:  Byrne (VP/CDD-Qns), Geltman (VP/CDD-Bx).]

Motion (Byrne/Geltman): Freeze any additional CDD hiring until additional staff attorney compensation has been decided. Failed: 3-7 [For:  Byrne (VP/CDD-Qns), Geltman (VP/CDD-Bx), Wadia (Health Benefits); Against:  Albro (Secy Treas.), Harpaz (VP/CAB), Hochberg (VP/JRD), Lundgren (VP/Volunteer), Torres (Sr. Attys), Wadia (Health Benefits), Wright (VP-CDD/Manhattan), Zuss (VP/CDD-Bk).]

[2]CBA § 2.1.1.1.:  “[S]hould the LAS receive, during the term of this contract, a funding increase sufficient to further narrow or close the comparability gap, the parties will, immediately upon learning of such increase, undertake to ascertain the four-boro average of total compensation received by non-managerial ADAs at yearly levels of service.  After ascertaining such ADA compensation, the LAS agrees to pay staff attorneys as close to comparable total compensation as such additional funding allows.”

[3]Roll-Call Vote (see above motion).

For: Abbandando, Albro, Austin, Blum, Bomba, Byrne, DiFlumeri, Flanders, Frederick, Gurwitch, Harpaz, Hopkirk, Knightly, Lacaprucia, Peters, Ritter, Roman, Wasserman, Zuss

Against: Affler, Dvorchak, Fiellman, Friedman, Hitchcock, Korotzer, Nevins, Seeley, Soto, Vasquez, Wright, Zablocki

Abstain: Edwards, Sender

September 23, 2002

2002.09.23: ALAA Delegate Council Minutes

From: ALAA HQ (Michael Letwin)
To: ALAA MEMBERS
Date: Mon, Sep 23, 2002 2:10 PM
Subject: ALAA Delegate Council Minutes

Attached are minutes of last Thursday’s Delegate Council meeting, the substantive issues at which were:

**City Criminal Contract
**CAB Staffing
**CDD Staffing
**Collective Bargaining
**Bylaw Amendments
**2002 Union Elections
**Terminated Attorneys’ Union Membership
**Change in Union VP Constituency

CC: 1199 Members

————-

Minutes of ALAA Delegate Council–September 19, 2002

Attendance

Citywide Officers: Letwin (President), Albro (Secy-Treasurer), Hitchcock (Recording Secretary)
CAB: Harpaz (VP), Elgarten
CDD-BxA: Rogers
CDD-BxB: Peppito
CDD-BxC: Bomba
CDD-Brooklyn: Zuss (VP), Torres (Alt. VP and Sr.
Atty rep.)
CDD-Bk1: Bell, Newton
CDD-Bk3: Flanders
CDD-Bk4: Pellegrino
CDD-Bk5: Lesher, Terry
CDD-Manhattan: Mulligan (Alt. VP)
CDD-M1: Arons, Sundram
CDD-M2: Siletti, Mitchell
CDD-M3: Collins, Vasquez
CDD-M4: Fiellman, O’Connell
CDD-M5: Seeley, Soto, Nagel (Alt.)
CDP-M6:
Affler, Botticelli
CDD-Spec Lit.: Wasserman
CDD-Q1: Morrison
CDD-Q3:
Knightly
CDD-Q4: Austin, Diflumeri
Civil: Holder
Civil-Aging:
Durham
Civil-Bx:
Frieder
CLO/Volunteer:
Lundgren (V.P.), Madhavan, Bournas-Ney
JRD: Hochberg (V.P.)
JRD-M: Lamb, Pappadopoulos
PRP: Zelermyer, Werlwas (observer)

Previous Minutes

•The DC unanimously adopted the following motion by Wasserman (CDD—S. Lit. and Hochberg (JRD): Adopt the Delegate Council minutes of July 23, 2002 [previously distributed].

City Criminal Contract

Letwin reported that, pending execution of the new city, LAS continues to receive criminal funding under its previous contract.

The Union’s litigation has not yet been formally settled.

CAB Staffing

Harpaz and Albro reported that voluntary reductions in CAB staffing and office location have generated $2m annual funding for CDD.

CDD Staffing

Letwin reported on discussions amongst city-wide officers, CDD union officers and CDD management about how to spend $8.6m in additional city criminal funding.

Based on reported feedback from CDD offices, the Union representatives have sought to balance needs for additional staffing (particularly in Manhattan) with preservation of at least $2m for staff attorney compensation increases above and beyond 3%.

(The amount of criminal funding designated to compensation drives the level funded for that purpose in all divisions).

Toward that end, the Union representatives have advocated: (1) Limits on new staff attorney hiring; (2) Few, if any, new supervisors. CDD management has supported more aggressive hiring, of both staff attorneys and supervisors.

Albro reported that Oxford is seeking a 19% premium increase for staff attorney health benefits in 2003.

The DC addressed the inherent trade-offs of these competing legitimate priorities as follows:

•By 10-19-9, the DC defeated the following EB proposal: Approve the position presented by the EB to management that CDD staff attorney hiring should not exceed 66 (except for 3 additional current diversity candidates) until and unless warranted by future experience.

•By of 15-6-6, the DC adopted a motion by Affler (CDD—Manhattan) to table the following motion by Torres and Zuss (CDD-Bk): Limit new CDD staff attorney hiring to 85.

•The DC unanimously adopted the following motion by Seeley and Siletti (CDD-Manhattan): Oppose all new permanent arraignment attorney positions.

•The DC unanimously adopted the following Executive Board motion: Achieve CDD supervision by redeployment of existing supervisors, not by hiring new supervisors.

Collective Bargaining

Letwin and Albro reported that, in order to prepare for contract bargaining, a contractually-mandated joint Union-Management analysis is underway concerning “the four-boro average of total compensation received by non-managerial ADAs at yearly levels of service.”

The EB has unanimously authorized distribution to members of: (1) Summary of changes made in past two rounds of contract negotiations; and (2) written contract surveys. [Forthcoming.]

Bylaw Amendments

•By 18-0-1, the DC adopted the following motion: Adopt Bylaw amendments unanimously formulated by the Bylaw Revision Committee.

•The DC unanimously adopted the following motion by Harpaz (CAB): Table further discussion concerning specific assignment of EB representation concerning health and safety and health benefits.

2002 Union Elections

•The DC unanimously adopted the following, modified, EB motion: Hold 2002 ALAA elections as follows: Sept 23—Beginning of 30-day nomination period; Oct. 22—Membership meeting to close 30-day nomination period; Nov. 6—Election notice; Nov. 21 —Office balloting; Dec. 17 —Post-election membership meeting to ratify Election Committee report and install officers.

The DC unanimously elected the following Election Committee: Marianne Allegro (JRD-Manhattan) (alt: Mark Leider), Jessica Botticelli (CDD-Manhattan), Adriene Holder (Civil), Arthur Hopkirk (CAB), Steve Wasserman (CDD-Spec. Lit.).

Terminated Attorneys’ Union Membership

•The DC unanimously adopted the following motion suggested by Albro and moved by Bomba (CDD-Bx): Pending ultimate resolution of grievances of their termination, continue Union membership of Alexander Hillery and Kenneth Schaeffer (Harlem-Civil).

Change in Union VP Constituency

•The DC unanimously adopted the following motions: Consistent with their relocation to 111 Livingston St., assign Parole Revocation Defense Unit (PRDU) and CDD-Spec. Lit. to CDD -Bk vice-president’s constituency.

Adjournment

The DC adjourned at approximately 8:55 p.m.

September 19, 2002

2002.09.19: ALAA Bylaws

Filed under: Union Democracy and Structure — nyclaw01 @ 1:24 pm
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[Download .pdf version: bylaw-amendment ]

Bylaws of

The Association of Legal Aid Attorneys,

Local Union 2325 of The International Union,

United Automobile, Aerospace And Agricultural

Implement Workers of America (UAW), AFL-CIO

Ratified September 19, 2002

 


Article I: Name

The name of this union will be The Association of Legal Aid Attorneys (ALAA), Local Union 2325 of the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), AFL-CIO.

Article II: Constitution

The Constitution of this union will be the Constitution of the International Union, UAW. These bylaws shall be subordinate to said Constitution.

Article III: Principles and Purposes

It will be the purpose of this union to:

●Organize and unite into the union all staff attorneys of The Legal Aid Society;

●Improve the working conditions, treatment, wages, benefits and professional standing of staff attorneys of The Legal Aid Society and protect all staff attorneys from illegal, improper, arbitrary or discriminatory treatment;

●Ensure the provision of high-quality legal services to our clients and advocate for the improvement of these services within the Society and in other appropriate arenas;

●Advocate for the advancement of the interests of our clients and of poor and working people in general through political and legislative outreach;

●Maintain relations with other labor organizations and work cooperatively with other unions for the advancement of the interests of our members, our clients and of poor and working people; and

●Educate our members in the history of the labor movement and develop and maintain an informed and dignified membership in the ranks of organized labor.

 

Article IV: Membership

§ 1. Principle and Authority. Since the union seeks to benefit the members and thrives by virtue of their support, the membership will be the highest authority within the union. It alone will have the authority to determine all critical issues. These include to: ratify contracts, strike, return to work, set dues, and elect Officers and at-large EB members and Delegates to UAW Conventions.

§ 2. Eligibility. Membership will be open to all employees of the bargaining unit(s) currently represented by the union and to those employees of other units who subsequently agree to the union’s representation and to those terminated employees whom the membership or the DC votes to retain as members.

§ 3. Good Standing. Members who have paid, or authorized checkoff of, all dues and other financial obligations will be members in good standing, unless suspended or expelled from membership as specified in Article 31 of the Constitution. Members on leave or layoff will remain in good standing so long as they have paid all dues or dues check-off is authorized and other financial obligations established by the union or required by the Constitution unless suspended or expelled from membership as specified in Article 31 of the Constitution. Members in good standing will be entitled to the benefits of membership, including voting and participating in the union’s affairs.

§ 4. Termination. Membership in the union will be terminated under any of the following circumstances: (1) Final termination of employment within the bargaining unit unless the membership or DC votes to retain the terminated employee as a member; (2) Acceptance of a managerial position; provided, that acceptance of a Delegate Council (DC)-approved temporary management position of three months or less will result in an approved leave status during such period; (3) Expulsion by decision of the Trial Committee pursuant to Article 31 of the Constitution; or (4) Resignation pursuant to the procedures set forth in Article 6, § 17 of the Constitution.

§ 5. Reinstatement. Any member who has resigned, or been suspended or expelled, from the union and who seeks to rejoin or to become a member in good standing will pay a reinstatement fee established by the union.

§ 6. Meetings.

§ 6.1. Frequency. The membership will meet at least monthly in each of the offices where employed. There will be a citywide membership meeting at least thirty (30) days prior to Officer and Executive Board (EB) elections, at which nominations for such offices will be accepted and a candidates’ forum held. At other times, the membership will meet citywide upon the (1) call of the President; (2) majority vote of the EB or the DC; or (3), petition of twenty-five percent (25%) of the membership.

§ 6.2. Quorum. A quorum at any citywide or local membership meeting will consist of twenty-five percent (25%) of the members in good standing prior to the meeting. If applicable, absentee ballots, as permitted by the EB or the DC, can be counted toward establishing a quorum.

§ 7. Voting. Except for the election of Officers and Delegates, which requires in-person voting at designated offices or polling place(s) (see Article VIII), and votes to strike or call off a strike, which will occur at a membership meeting, the membership may vote by mail, at a citywide or other appropriate meeting, or in person at a designated office or polling place(s), as determined by the EB or DC. Provision for absentee ballots for membership votes may be made by the EB or DC to the extent that it is consistent with the Constitution Art. 19, § 3; Art. 38, § 10; or Art. 50, § 1(b).

 

Article V: Delegates Council

§ 1. Authority. The DC will be the highest authority in the union after the membership. Among other powers, it will elect three pension Trustees and the Election Committee. No grievance will be arbitrated without its approval.

§ 2. Composition. The DC will consist of: (1) Delegates elected by members of each work site (complexes in the Criminal Defense Division (CDD), offices in the Juvenile Rights Division (JRD) proper and the Civil Division, units in the Criminal Appeals Bureau (CAB) proper (Parole Revocation Defense Unit (PRDU), Prisoners Rights Project (PRP), etc.), according to the following formula: one (1) Delegate per every ten (10) members, rounded up to the nearest multiple of ten (10), with each office, unit and complex entitled to at least one (1) Delegate; and (2) All Officers. There will be a reapportionment every October 1 for the purposes of establishing the number of Delegates to which each office, unit and complex is entitled.

§ 3. Meetings. The DC will meet citywide at least every two (2) months, and at other times as scheduled by the President, the EB or itself. Delegates from each office, unit and complex will meet at least monthly. A quorum consists of twenty percent (20%) of the total number of Delegate positions allocated, regardless of whether they are filled.

§ 4. Voting. Each Delegate is entitled to one (1) vote. The members of each office, unit and complex may elect up to three (3) ranked alternates, who may vote only if the Delegate is absent at a DC or office, unit or complex Delegates meeting. Officers, other than the President, will be entitled to vote as if they were Delegates. The President may vote only when the DC is equally divided and the President is presiding. If an Officer other than the President is presiding, that Officer will only have a right to vote when the DC is equally divided.

Article VI: Executive Board

§ 1. Authority. The EB will be empowered to represent the union between meetings of the union when urgent business requires prompt and decisive action. The EB will also serve as the union’s Bargaining Committee.

§ 2. Composition. The EB will be composed of the following sixteen (16) Executive Officers:

(1) President;

(2) Financial Secretary-Treasurer;

(3) Recording Secretary;

(4) Three (3) Union Trustees;

(5) Sergeant-at-Arms;

(6) Guide;

(7) Vice-President for the Civil Division;

(8) Vice-President for the Criminal Appeals Bureau, Capital Defense Unit and Federal Defender Division;

(9) Vice-President for the Criminal Defense Division/Brooklyn;

(10) Vice-President for the Criminal Defense Division/Bronx;

(11) Vice-President for the Criminal Defense Division/ Manhattan;

(12) Vice-President for the Criminal Defense Division/Queens;

(13) Vice-President for the Juvenile Rights Division; and

(14) Vice-President for the Volunteer Division/Community Law Offices.

The EB will also include six (6) at-large members representing the following areas: (1) Senior Attorneys;

(2) Junior Attorneys;

(3) Attorneys of Color of Legal Aid (ACLA);

(4) Gay and Lesbian Attorneys;

(5) Affirmative Action; and

(6) Part-time Attorneys.

The at-large EB members will be responsible for calling regular ongoing meetings of the caucus or committee s/he represents and for arranging advance notice of such meetings to the membership.

§ 3. Election. All Executive Officers and at-large EB members will be elected by the entire membership; the Vice-Presidents will be elected by their respective constituencies.

§ 4. Meetings. The EB will meet at least monthly, except during August. The Recording Secretary will take the minutes of EB meetings, unless unavailable, in which event the President will designate another EB member to take the minutes.

§ 5. Voting. Each EB member is entitled to one (1) vote. The members of constituencies represented by a Vice-President may elect up to two (2) ranked Alternate Vice-Presidents, who may vote only in the Vice-President’s absence. Alternate Vice-Presidents may simultaneously serve as Delegates on the DC; however, in the absence of the Vice-President, no Alternate Vice-Presi­dent/Delegate may cast more than one (1) vote.

§ 6. Reporting. All decisions of the EB shall be reported to the membership and the DC.

Article VII: Executive Officers

§ 1. President. The President will be the chief executive Officer of the union. In addition to the duties specified in the Constitution, the President will preside over meetings, and be charged with carrying out all resolutions of the membership, DC and EB. The President will be responsible for the administration of the union between meetings of those bodies, and will represent the union in its dealings with other UAW bodies, organizations, and any public entities. The President, and the Financial Secretary-Treasurer in his/her absence, will be an ex-officio member of all union committees.

§ 2. Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The Financial Secretary-Treasurer will, in case of resignation, illness, removal, death or absence of the President, carry out all duties of the President, until, if necessary, an election for President is held pursuant to Article VIII, § 3. In addition to the duties specified in the Constitution, the Financial Secretary-Treasurer will carry out all duties prescribed by the President and resolutions of the membership, DC and EB, and attend all meetings, and take custody of all votes and minutes of meetings of those bodies. The Financial Secretary-Treasurer will also have custody of all union funds, keep records of all receipts and disbursements, and submit periodic accountings of the union’s financial transactions to the union Trustees, the DC and the EB.

§ 3. Recording Secretary. In addition to the duties specified in the Constitution, the Recording Secretary will take the minutes of EB and DC meetings.

§ 4. Vice-Presidents. The Vice-Presidents will carry out all duties prescribed by the President and their respective constituencies and attend all meetings, and carry out all resolutions of the membership, DC and EB. The Vice-Presidents will preside over all meetings of the members and Delegates of their respective constituencies.

§ 5. Union Trustees.

§ 6. Sergeant-at-Arms.

§ 7. Guide.

Article VIII: Elections

§ 1. Eligibility. Executive Officer candidates must be a member in good standing for one (1) year prior to the nomination. Candidates for Delegate must be a member in good standing for six (6) months prior to the election. The Senior Attorney representative must be in the tenth (10th) year or greater of service within the bargaining unit. The Junior Attorney representative must be at seniority step 4 or below, and, once elected, cannot continue to serve after step 6. The ACLA & Gay and Lesbian representatives must be members of their respective constituencies.

§ 2. Terms. Pursuant to Article 38, § 2 of the International Union Constitution, all terms of office for Officers, Alternate Vice-Presidents, and at-large members of the EB will be three years. Pursuant to Article 45 of the Constitution, Delegates and Alternate Delegates will have a two-year term. The first elections under these bylaws will take place by October 31, 1999. The precise date of subsequent general elections will be set by the EB or DC, provided that it occurs within thirty (30) days of the three (3)-year anniversary of the previous general elections of EB members and the two (2)-year anniversary of the previous election of Delegates. The election of members of the Election Committee will occur at a DC meeting prior to general elections.

§ 3. Vacancies. All Officer and other EB vacancies shall be filled promptly by a special election. Pending the special election: (1) A presidential vacancy shall be filled by one of the vice-presidents elected by the DC; (2) A vice presidential vacancy shall be filled by the first Alternate vice-president; (3) All other officer or EB vacancy shall be filled by the DC.

§ 4. Procedure.

§ 4.1. Elections Committee. An Elections Committee, comprised of non-candidates and elected by the DC, will conduct, oversee and certify all union elections. Non-candidate Officers, Delegates and Alternates may assist in conducting elections.

§ 4.2. Nominations. Written or e-mailed officer nominations will be accepted by the Election Committee during a period thirty (30) days prior to a citywide membership meeting during which additional oral nominations will also be accepted and a candidates forum conducted.

§ 4.3. Time and Notice of Voting. All elections will occur not earlier than seven (7) days after the close of nominations and for general elections regardless of whether a quorum was present at the nomina­tions/candidate forum meeting. Fifteen (15) days notice of general elections and special Officer elections must be given.

§ 4.4. Location of Voting. Members will vote in person in their offices or at designated polling place(s).

§ 4.5. Margin Required. Pursuant to Article 38 of the Constitution, election of Executive Officers will require a majority of votes cast. All other elections will be by plurality vote. § 4.6. Uncontested Elections. Pursuant to Const. Art. 38, Sec. 17, unopposed candidates shall be considered elected.

§ 4.7. Voting Procedure. Voting procedures utilized will be designed to accommodate the greatest number of members, particularly those assigned to work night arraignment shifts.

§ 4.8 Installation. Within 30 days of a general election, there shall be a membership meeting at which, regardless of quorum, the elections committee shall give its report on the election results and the elected officers and EB members shall be installed. Any timely protest to the election could be discussed at this meeting, but shall only be voted on by the membership at a subsequent meeting or other form of vote, held within 30 days thereafter.

Article IX: Dues And Fees

§ 1. Initiation Fee. There will be a fifty dollar ($50) initiation fee for new members.

§ 2. Reinstatement Fee. Any member who has lost “good standing status” for whatever reason and applies to be reinstated to same shall pay a $50 reinstatement fee, in addition to any dues or fees owed the union.

§ 3. Dues. Any changes in the dues structure must be approved by the membership.

Article X: Strikes

§ 1. Violating a Strike. Any member who works for The Legal Aid Society (LAS) or another bargaining unit represented by the union during a strike at that employer will be guilty of violating a strike. Any member accused of violating a strike will be subject to a trial under Article 31 of the Constitution and, if found guilty, to the penalties specified therein.

 

Article XI: Staffing

Finances permitting, the President and Financial Secretary-Treasurer, in that order, will be on union staff, and will receive the same salary and benefits they would have received on active LAS staff. Any additional union staff will be determined by the EB.

Article XII: Parliamentary Order

Robert’s Rules of Order will apply in all situations not covered by the International Union Constitution or these bylaws.

Article XIII: Amendments

These bylaws may be amended by a majority vote of the members, after thirty (30) days notice of the proposed amendment, or by a majority vote of the DC, after the proposed amendment is noticed on the agenda of two (2) consecutive DC meetings.

Article XIV: Savings Clause

A declaration that any provision of these bylaws is null and void will not in any way affect the validity of other provisions or the bylaws as a whole.

Article XV: Adoption

These bylaws will become effective upon their adoption by a majority vote of the membership.

2002.09.19: ALAA Delegate Council Bulletin #85

ALAA Delegate Council Bulletin #85

Thursday, September 19, 2002, 6:30 p.m. sharp

•Location: 568 Broadway, Rm. 702A (N/R to Prince, B/D/F/Q to Broadway-Lafayette, 6 to Spring).

•Estimated length: Approximately 2 hours.

•All ALAA members welcome (only elected representatives may vote).

•Free pizza/soda.

•TO PROVIDE PROPER NOTICE TO ALL MEMBERS, PLEASE SUBMIT ADDITIONAL AGENDA ITEMS IN ADVANCE.

Proposed Agenda

1. Minutes.

2. LAS Criminal Budget (1 hr.)

2.1. City contract status.

2.2. CAB staffing.

2.3. CDD staffing. Motion (Executive Board): Approve the position presented by the EB to management that CDD staff attorney hiring should not exceed 66 (except for 3 additional current diversity candidates) until and unless warranted by future experience; and (2) Additional CDD supervision should be achieved through redeployment of existing supervisors, not through hiring new supervisors.

3. Collective Bargaining (20 min).

3.1. ADA comparability.

3.2. Membership materials. Sept. 17 EB decision to distribute to all members: (1) Summary of changes in past two contracts; (2) Membership contract survey.

4. Internal (45 min).

4.1. Bylaw revision. Unanimously recommended by the EB (redlined version attached).

4.2. Proposed election timetable. Unanimous EB proposed timetable for November 21, 2002 Union elections (below).

4.3. Election Committee. Selection of ALAA Election Committee.

4.4. Membership status for terminated attorneys.

4.5. PRDU representation. PRDU request, due to office move, for transfer from jurisdiction of CAB VP to that of CDD–Bk V.P.

5. Political Action (5 min.).

6. Adjournment.

Proposed 2002 ALAA Election Timetable

Date

Action

Bylaw Reference

Sept. 19

DC vote on proposed bylaw amendments

Art. IX (“These bylaws may be amended by a majority vote of the members, after thirty (30) days notice of the proposed amendment, or by a majority vote of the DC, after the proposed amendment is noticed on the agenda of two (2) consecutive DC meetings.”)

Sept. 19

Formation of Election Committee (EC) by DC

Art. VIII, Sec. 4.1

Sept 30

Beginning of 30-day nomination period

Art. IV, Sec. 6.1; Art. VIII, Sec. 4.2

Oct. 30

Membership meeting to close 30-day nomination period

By Nov. 6

Election notice (15 days prior to election)

Art. IV, Sec. 6.1; Art. VIII, Sec. 4.3

Nov. 21

Office balloting (<7 days after close of nominations)

Dec. 17

Post-election membership meeting to ratify Election Committee report and install officers

Proposed Art. VIII, Sec. 8.8 (“Within 30 days of a general election, there shall be a membership meeting at which the elections committee shall give its report on the election results and the elected officers and EB members shall be installed. Any timely protest to the election could be discussed at this meeting, but shall only be voted on by the membership at a subsequent meeting or other form of vote, held within 30 days thereafter.”)

Minutes of Special ALAA Delegate Council

On LAS Criminal Funding–July 23, 2002

Attendance

Citywide Officers: Letwin (President), Albro (Secy-Treasurer), Hitchcock (Recording Secretary)

CAB: Harpaz (VP), Blum (Alt. VP), Hopkirk, Peters, Sender, Ginsburg (PRP)

CDD–Bx: Gurwitch (Alt. VP and BxB), Roman (BxA), Abbandando and Bomba (BxC)

CDD–Bk: Zuss (VP), Korotzer (Alt. VP and Bk2), Ritter and Flanders (Bk3)

CDD-Manhattan: Wright (VP), Mulligan (Alt. VP), Nevins (M1), Friedman (M2), Vasquez (M3), Dvorchak and Fiellman (M4), Seeley and Soto (M5), Affler and Zablocki (M6), Wasserman (Spec. Lit)

CDD-Qns: Byrne (VP), Frederick and Knightly (Q3), Austin and Diflumeri (Q4)

Civil: Lacaprucia (Harlem)

CLO/Volunteer: Edwards (Alt. VP)

Counsel: Engelstein

1. Overview.

The DC received detailed reports concerning the status of Legal Aid’s city criminal contract, including: (1) Negotiations with the Bloomberg administration; (2) Counsel’s view of Union/Society litigation challenging the city’s conduct prior to, during and since the 1994 strike; and (3) CAB/CDD staffing.

Following these reports, the DC voted as follows on the substantive motions below.

2. Pending ALAA Litigation.

By a vote of 19-11-4, the DC adopted a motion by Mulligan and Affler (2d) (CDD-Manhattan) to table the following motion by Byrne and Diflumeri (CDD–Qns): Condition settlement (not dismissal) of the Union’s litigation concerning the 1994 strike on management’s written assurance that additional staff (other than replacement of attrition) will not be hired until after staff attorney compensation is increased by more than 2.5%/year.

By a vote of 19-12-2 (roll call below ), the DC adopted the following motion by Bomba (CDD–Bx) and Zuss (CDD–Bk): Authorize the ALAA Executive Board to decide settlement of the Union’s litigation concerning the 1994 strike, following negotiations with LAS management over allocation of additional city funds.

[In response to this motion, the EB informed management that, at least $2m/year of additional LAS city criminal funds should be reserved for staff attorney compensation increases, above and beyond the 2.5% already budgeted for that purpose. Management replied that it would lift the minimum compensation increase to 3%, and would negotiate over further compensation increases.

Following conclusion of negotiations between LAS and the city concerning the Society’s criminal contract, the EB authorized settlement of ALAA’s pending federal litigation as a condition of increased city funding.

3. CDD/CAB Staffing.

By a vote of 19-2-3, the DC adopted the following motion by Harpaz (CAB) and Ritter (CDD–Bk): Oppose involuntary transfers from CAB to CDD, and delegate to ALAA’s CAB representatives the decision about whether the Union authorizes voluntary CAB buyouts.

[Shortly thereafter, LAS management reduced its proposal for CAB staff attorney reductions to 14. In response, the CAB members agreed to authorize voluntary buyouts.

2002.09.19: Minutes of ALAA Delegate Council – September 19, 2002

2002.09.19 – Minutes of ALAA Delegate Council — OCR

Minutes of ALAA Delegate Council-September 19, 2002

Attendance

Citywide Officers: Letwin (President), Albro (SecyTreasurer),

Hitchcock (Recording Secretary)

CAB: Harpaz (VP), Elgarten

CDD-BxA: Rogers

CDD-BxB: Peppito

CDD-BxC: Bomba

CDD-Brooklyn: Zuss (VP), Torres (Alt. VP and Sr.

Atty rep.)

CDD-Bkl: Bell, Newton

CDD-Bk3: Flanders

CDD-Bk4: ·Pellegrino

CDD-Bk5: Lesher, Terry

CDD-Manhattan: Mulligan (Alt. VP)

CDD-Ml: Arons, Sundram

CDD-M2: Siletti, Mitchell

CDD-M3: Collins, Vasquez

CDD-M4: Fiellman, O’Connell

CDD-M5: Seeley, Soto, Nagel (Alt.)

CDD-M6: A:ffler, Botticelli

CDD-Spec Lit.: Wasserman

CDD-Ql Morrison

CDD-Q3: Knightly

CDD-Q4: Austin, Diflumeri

Civil: Holder

Civil-Aging: Durham

Civil-Bx: Frieder

CLO/Volunteer: Lundgren (V.P.), Madhavan,

Bournas-Ney

JRD: Hochberg (V.P.)

JRD-M: Lamb, Pappadopoulos

PRP: Zelermyer, Werlwas (observer)

Previous Minutes

,.. The DC unanimously adopted the

following motion by Wasserman (CDD-S. Lit.

and Hochberg (JRD): Adopt the Delegate

Council minutes of .July 23, 2002 [previously

distributed].

City Criminal Contract

Letwin reported that, pending execution of

the new city, LAS continues to receive criminal

funding under its previous contract. The

Union’s litigation has not yet been formally

settled.

CAB Staffin~

Harpaz and Albro reported that voluntary

reductions in CAB staffing and office location

have generated $2m annual funding for CDD.

CDD Staffin~

Letwin reported on discussions amongst

city-wide officers, CDD union officers and CDD

management about how to spend $8.6m in

additional city criminal funding.

Based on reported feedback from CDD

offices, the Union representatives have sought to

balance needs for additional staffing (particularly

in Manhattan) with preservation of at least $2m

for staff attorney compensation increases above

and beyond 3%.

(The amount of criminal funding designated

to compensation drives the level funded for that

purpose in all divisions).

Toward that end, the Union representatives

have advocated: ( 1) Limits on new staff attorney

hiring; (2) Few, if any, new supervisors. CDD

management has supported more aggressive

hiring, of both staff attorneys and supervisors.

Albro reported that Oxford is seeking a 19%

premium increase for staff attorney health

benefits in 2003.

The DC addressed the inherent trade-offs of

these competing legitimate priorities as follows:

,.. By 10-19-9, the DC defeated the following

EB proposal: Approve the position presented

by the EB to management that CDD staff

attorney hiring should not exceed 66 (except

for 3 additional current diversity candidates)

until and unless warranted by future

expenence.

,.. By of 15-6-6, the DC adopted a motion by

Affier (CDD-Manhattan) to table the following

motion by Torres and Zuss (CDD-Bk): Limit

new CDD staff attorney hiring to 85.

,.. The DC unanimously adopted the

following motion by Seeley and Siletti

Minutes of ALAA Delegate Council-September 19, 2002 Page 2

(CDD-Manhattan): Oppose all new permanent

arraignment attorney positions.

“‘”The DC unanimously adopted the

following Executive Board motion: Achieve

additional CDD supervision by redeployment

of existing supervisors, not by !tiring new

supervisors.

Collective Bargaining

Letwin and Albro reported that, in order to

prepare for contract bargaining, a contractuallymandated

joint Union-Management analysis is

underway concerning “the four-boro average of

total compensation received by non-managerial

AD As at yearly levels of service.”

The EB has unanimously authorized

distribution to members of: (1) Summary of

changes made in past two rounds of contract

i1egotiations; and (2) written contract surveys.

[Forthcoming.]

Bylaw Amendments

~~>By 18-0-1, the DC adopted the following

motion: Adopt Bylaw amendments

unanimously formulated by the Bylaw

Revision Committee.

“‘”The DC unanimously adopted the

following motion by Harpaz (CAB): Table

further discussion concerning specific

assignment of EB representation concerning

health and safety and health benefits.

2002 Union Elections

“‘”The DC unanimously adopted the

following, modified, EB motion: Hold 2002

ALAA elections as follows: Sept

2

23-Beginning of 30-day nomination period;

Oct. 22-Membership meeting to close 30-day

nomination period; Nov. 6 -Election notice;

Nov. 21-0ffice balloting; Dec.

17 -Post-election membership meeting to ratifY

Election Committee report and install officers.

“‘”The DC unanimously elected the

following Election Committee: Marianne

Allegro (JRD-Manhattan)(alt: Mark Leider),

Jessica Botticelli (CDD-Manhattan), Adriene

Holder (Civil), Arthur Hopkirk (CAB), Steve

Wasserman (CDD-8pec. Lit.).

Terminated Attorneys’ Union

Membership

“‘”The DC unanimously adopted the

following motion suggested by Albro and moved

by Bomba (CDD-Bx): Pending ultimate

resolution of grievances of their termination,

continue Union membership of Alexander

Hillery and Kenneth Schaeffer

(Harlem -Civil).

Change in Union VP Constituency

“‘”The DC unanimously adopted the

following motions: Consistent with their

relocation to 111 Livingston St., assign Parole

Revocation Defense Unit (PRDU) and

CDD-8pec. Lit. to CDD-Bk vice-president’s

constituency.

Adjournment

The DC adjourned at approximately 8:55

p.m.

September 16, 2002

2002.09.16: Legal Aid Hopes 90 Church Street Is in Its Future

Filed under: Uncategorized — nyclaw01 @ 12:03 pm
Tags:

From: MLetwin@HQWEST.WEST [mailto:MLetwin@HQWEST.WEST]
Sent: Monday, September 16, 2002 2:00 PM
To: ALAA MEMBERS@HQWEST.WEST
Cc: 1199 Members@HQWEST.WEST
Subject: NYLJ ARTICLE ABOUT 90 CHURCH
Importance: High

http://www6.law.com/lawcom/displayid.cfm?statename=NY&docnum=150648&table=news&flag=full

New York Law Journal, September 9, 2002

One Year Later
Legal Aid Hopes 90 Church Street Is in Its Future
By Tom Perrotta

Since evacuating its Church Street offices on Sept. 11, the Legal Aid Society has yet to receive encouraging news about its once-stylish home.
The roof of the building, located at 90 Church Street, was hit by an engine from one of the planes that slammed into the Twin Towers. Windows shattered as the towers fell, and toxins soon filled the building.

By the end of last year, officials at Legal Aid were told by two environmental testing agencies that the offices were beyond repair and would have to be stripped down to the slab and refurbished.

The environmental agencies, one hired by Legal Aid and another by Boston Properties, which manages the building for its owner, the U.S. Postal Service, found asbestos, lead and fiberglass dust, and other toxins throughout the building.

A year after the attacks, the prognosis for the building is essentially the same, said Daniel Greenberg, Legal Aid’s president.

“Until we have confidence that the building is safe, we are not going to be back there,” he said. “We are being told by our experts that nothing short of stripping the space down to its concrete walls will do that.”

But the rebuilding process has not begun and may never happen.

Greenberg said that Legal Aid, the Postal Service and Boston Properties were still in discussions with their insurance carriers and had not come to a conclusion on a course of action.

Stripping Building is Option

Stripping the building is still an option, he said, but added the agency might have to look at other buildings large enough to house their attorneys and staff. All possible outcomes, he said, are tentative at this point.

In the interim, Legal Aid has strewn 450 employees about town in various offices, including a few that were recently rented through 2003.

The agency’s administrative staff, which had been borrowing space from the Criminal Defense Division at 49 Thomas Street, is now renting the 28th floor of Pillsbury Winthrop’s office at 1 Battery Park Plaza.

The agency also has rented the 22nd floor at Pillsbury for its Capital Defense Division and a portion of the 27th floor to accommodate the managing attorney’s office for criminal appeals. The Capital Defense Division had been working out of the Thomas Street office, but the Criminal Division recently hired 30 new attorneys and needed the extra space.

The managing attorney’s office, which had been renting space from Cravath Swaine & Moore at 825 Eighth Avenue, is moving because Cravath needs the space, said Pat Bath, a spokeswoman for Legal Aid.

The Society has also rented space at two other locations: 304 Park Avenue South, where the central administration of the Juvenile Rights Division and some appellate attorneys moved earlier this summer, and 199 Water Street, where members of the Civil Division will be moving.

Besides renting new space, the agency has also expanded its office on Montague Street in Brooklyn by reclaiming two floors that had been subleased. Those floors will be the new home of the Criminal Appeals Division, which had been spread out throughout Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx after Sept. 11.

“The moving does wear on people,” Bath said. “It’s very difficult.”

Bath said the agency’s hope is to return to refinished offices at Church Street, whose design, she said, “was symbolic of the rejuvenation of the Legal Aid Society.”

September 13, 2002

2002.09.13: NYT Coverage of 90 Church

Filed under: Union Democracy and Structure — nyclaw01 @ 1:26 pm
Tags: ,

From: MLetwin@HQWEST.WEST [mailto:MLetwin@HQWEST.WEST]
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 12:37 PM
To: ALAA MEMBERS@HQWEST.WEST
Cc: 1199 Members@HQWEST.WEST
Subject: NYT COVERAGE OF 90 CHURCH
Importance: High

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/11/business/11CHUR.html?ex=1032876074&ei=1&en=f3607535cd5c42c9

A Big Victim Is Still Empty After a Year NYT, September 11, 2002 By DAVID W. DUNLAP

Only the magnitude of disaster a few yards away could have eclipsed the painful story of the former Federal Office Building at 90 Church Street.

This imposing one-million-square-foot Art Deco structure was handsomely renovated in the late 1990’s by Boston Properties, which holds the master lease. Until Sept. 11, it housed nearly 3,000 employees of the United States Postal Service, the New York City Housing Authority and the Legal Aid Society. Today, it is empty and sealed off. No one knows when it will reopen.

Though it looks undamaged to passers-by, the building was permeated by contaminants, including lead, mercury and asbestos, from the collapse of 7 World Trade Center and the twin towers.

“It just rained down and in,” said Dan Kessler, general services director for the Legal Aid Society, which had its headquarters and numerous divisions in the top three floors of the 15-story building, completed in 1935.

If there was anything resembling good news that morning, it was that no one who worked at 90 Church Street was killed or seriously injured.

Any hope that the building could be quickly reoccupied vanished in the months after the attack, as the degree of contamination became apparent.

“Levels of specific contaminants alone are a concern, and combined they form a contaminant cocktail that represents a significant health and liability risk,” the Airtek Environmental Corporation said in a report prepared for the Legal Aid Society. Airtek found asbestos, lead dust, fungi, fiberglass dust, heavy metals, mercury, bacteria and decayed organic matter.

Apart from buildings like 1 Bankers Trust Plaza and 90 West Street, which were catastrophically damaged, 90 Church Street is the last of the big office towers around ground zero that remains vacant, according to Insignia/ESG, a commercial real estate company.

It is too early to gauge the economic consequences for the building, because it is not yet entirely clear how the structure will be cleaned and who will pay for doing so.
There are no property taxes to pay because the building is owned by the Postal Service and leased to 90 Church Street Ltd., an affiliate of Boston Properties, the real estate investment trust.

Boston Properties and the tenants have been working on a cleaning plan and are “very close to an agreement,” said Robert E. Selsam, the senior vice president and regional manager of Boston Properties.

“We had to develop a clean-up approach from scratch because there is no standard for many of the contaminants we found,” he said. “We’ve taken a very careful, measured and reasoned approach. The last thing I want is somebody back in the building if it’s not safe.”

The lobby, a luminously memorable space with 20-foot-high green marble columns under a ceiling of translucent glass panels, was used as a temporary morgue after the attack. It has since been cleaned, Mr. Selsam said, and hundreds of broken windows have been replaced.

Reclaiming the tenants’ spaces will mean extensive interior demolition, because contaminants have been found behind walls, on ceiling tiles and inside office partitions. The cost will run into the tens of millions of dollars.

“Our most important value is the safety and health of our staff, clients and visitors,” Daniel L. Greenberg, president of the Legal Aid Society, said. “We’ve been told by environmental specialists that the only way to be sure of safety is demolition to the walls. It obviously has large and profound insurance implications.”

Work might begin this November, Mr. Selsam said, and take about three or four months. After the retesting of the spaces for contaminants, tenants could begin rebuilding their offices, meaning a possible return to 90 Church Street late next summer or early fall.

“We would rather do it better than quicker,” said David L.
Solomon, the Postal Service vice president for the New York metro area. The service operated a post office in the first four floors, with about 850 employees. Contaminants found in the post office space included mercury, lead, cadmium, asbestos and polychlorinated biphenyls, said Jamie Cohen, the facility activation coordinator at the Postal Service for the metro area.

As it stands, the Church Street station may not reopen until November 2003. Even that date is tentative, Mr. Cohen said, because it “requires so many time frames and pieces of the puzzle fitting together.”

Customers at the Church Street station included the tenants of the World Trade Center and World Financial Center, the Parking Violations Bureau and numerous banks and insurance companies, Mr. Solomon said, some of whom receive their mail in five-ton trucks.

Most operations were moved to the James A. Farley Building across Eighth Avenue from Pennsylvania Station.

The Housing Authority, by far the largest tenant, occupied nearly 450,000 square feet on seven and a half floors. Some 1,500 to 1,700 people worked in design, construction, finance, human resources, computer services, tenancy administration and housing applications, in the adjudicatory division and welfare employee program and in other fields.

The authority has leased 100,000 square feet of space at 90 Fifth Avenue, at 14th Street. It has also moved employees to its headquarters at 250 Broadway and other existing offices, including 350 Livingston Street in Brooklyn and
23-02 49th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens.

It estimates the cost of damages and dislocation from 90 Church Street at $93 million, said a spokesman, Howard Marder. That includes cleaning and rebuilding, replacing lost property and destroyed vehicles, and counseling its employees, many of whom witnessed horrific scenes that morning.

“Initially, the instruction was not to leave,” recalled Mr.
Kessler of the Legal Aid Society. “People were falling.
Pieces of the building were falling. Flaming debris was falling.” Part of the jetliner that hit the north tower plummeted to the roof of 90 Church Street, directly over the juvenile rights division, knocking loose the entire suspended ceiling frame. No one was hurt.

Had the attack occurred a bit later, the office would have been full. About 400 people worked in administration, payroll, accounting and human resources and in divisions handling homeless rights, health law, immigration, law reform, civil appeals and death penalty cases.

In addition, the society’s computer system – 65 servers in all – is at 90 Church Street, linking offices and courtrooms citywide.

Building engineers managed an orderly shutdown of the ventilating and electrical systems, Mr. Selsam said. But the collapse of 7 World Trade Center set numerous fires in 90 Church Street. The sprinkler tanks emptied, filling the structure with water, which coursed down elevator shafts, causing further damage.

“Then we weren’t able to get into the building for a long time,” Mr. Selsam said, “so mold developed and spread everywhere.”

With the help of Boston Properties and an emergency generator, the Legal Aid Society was able to jury-rig a power supply to its computers about 10 days after the attack. They have been running since. In midwinter, the society removed 20,000 cartons of material to Linden, N.J., after cleaning it in makeshift decontamination chambers in the elevator lobbies at 90 Church Street.

Employees are scattered in the society’s 22 offices, including 49 Thomas Street in Lower Manhattan. Headquarters are in 25,000 square feet at 1 Battery Park Plaza, on a sublease from the law firm of Pillsbury Winthrop. The society also plans to take space at 199 Water Street.

Factoring in the expense of stripping the space at 90 Church Street to the slab and rebuilding it, the society estimates the cost of recovering from the attack at $25 million to $30 million, said Theresa de León, the chief operating officer and chief financial officer.

“We didn’t realize at each step how long it would be,” she said. “We thought it would be a matter of six weeks, a short-term issue, that we would be back at our desks by the holidays.”

They may yet. Thanksgiving 2003.

September 6, 2002

2002.09.06: Defense of Civil Liberties Tomorrow

From: MLetwin@HQWEST.WEST [mailto:MLetwin@HQWEST.WEST]
Sent: Friday, September 06, 2002 12:08 PM
To: 1199 Members@HQWEST.WEST; ALAA MEMBERS@HQWEST.WEST
Subject: DEFENSE OF CIVIL LIBERTIES: Tomorrow
Importance: High

ALAA, the UAW and 1199 are among the many labor, civil liberties, community, religious and political organizations to endorse this event, the second day of NYC labor solidarity with post-9/11 immigrants who continue to be detained without charges, some of them secretly and without attorneys.

It is particularly convenient for members who live in Brooklyn.

—————————-
NYC Labor Solidarity With Immigrant Workers and Detainees Saturday, September 7, 2002

“An immigration violation should not give the government license to rip up the rule book. By restricting judicial oversight and blocking public scrutiny, the government has exercised virtually unchecked power over those it has detained.” (Human Rights Watch, August 14, 2002, <http://hrw.org/reports/2002/us911/&gt; )

Assemble: 10:30 a.m., 9 St./5 Ave., Brooklyn (N/R to 9 St. or F to 4 Ave.)
March: 11 a.m.–Sharp
Rally: 12 Noon–Sharp, Metropolitan Detention Center, 29 St./3d Ave., Brooklyn (N/R to 25 St./4 Ave.).
Map:  http://www.cmap.nypirg.org/netmaps/Straps/Straphangers.asp?name=Straps&Left=596847.860813705&Bottom=639320.769037262&Right=670659.860813705&Top=694482.199444114&Reg=NYC&UsrD=true&Action=ZoomIn&Address=&Boro=Bronx&ByNeighborhood=Select&ByStation=Select&x=244&y=161

Sponsor: Justice For Detainees

Labor Sponsors (list in formation)
<>AFSCME DC 37
<>AFSCME DC 1707
<>Assn. of Legal Aid Attorneys/UAW L.2325 <>CWA L.1180 <>Legal Aid Society Chap., 1199/SEIU <>Natl. Org. of Legal Services Workers/UAW L.2320 <>Natl. Writers Union/UAW L.1981 <>NY Taxi Workers Alliance <>NYC Labor Against the War (NYCLAW) <>Organization of Staff Analysts <>Professional Staff Congress-CUNY/AFT L.2334 <>SEIU 1199 <>SEIU NY State Council <>UAW Region 9A NYC Area CAP Council <>UNITE Amalgamated Services & Allied Joint Bd.
<>United Elec., Radio & Machine Workers of America (UE)
********************************
<>Larry Adams, Co-convener NYCLAW
<>Martin Fishgold, Pres., Metro NY Labor Communications Council* <>Christine Karatnytsky, Exec. Bd., NY Public Library Guild, AFSCME L.1930* <>Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz, Dir., Queens College Worker Ed. Extension Ctr. (FIPO); PSC-CUNY/AFT L.2334 & NWU/UAW L.1981 <>Robert Lesko, V.P., AFT L.3882* <>John O’Connor, Secy.-Treas., AFM L.1000* <>Dennis O’Neil, Legislative Dir., NY Metro Area Postal Union/APWU L.10* <>J.P. Patafio, Depot Chair, TWU L.100* <>Joel Schwartz, Pres., CSEA/AFSCME L.446* <>Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, RN, Chair, Delegate Assembly, NYS Nurses Assn.* <>Maf Misbah Uddin, VP, DC 37; Pres. AFSCME L.1407* <>Roger Toussaint, Pres., Transport Workers Union L.100* <>Coal of Black Trade Unionists, NYC Branch
<>Gangbox: Construction Workers News Serv <>Global Sweatshop Coal <>Greater NY Labor-Religion Coal <>Industrial Workers of the World (NYC) <>Labor at the Crossroads TV <>Make the Road by Walking <>Natl. Employment Law Project <>Natl. Lawyers Guild/NYC Chap., Labor & Employment Cttee <>New Caucus of PSC/CUNY <>NY Jobs with Justice <>Pride at Work/NYC (AFL-CIO) <>Student Cttee. Against Labor Exploitation <>US Health Trade Union Cttee.

*Position shown for ID only; no organizational endorsement implied.

Info: JusticeForDetainees@hotmail.com or or 718-482-3157

Cosponsors (list in formation)
<>Al-Farouq Mosque
<>American Assn. of Jurists
<>American Friends Serv. Cttee.
<>American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Cttee.
<>Another World is Possible
<>Arab-American Alumni and Professionals <>Asian American Legal Defense & Ed. Fund <>Asian Americans for Equality <>Assoc. of Pakistani Physicians of North America<>Biet Almagdis Mosque <>Black Radical Congress <>Bklyn Bridges <>Bklyn Heights Peace Action <>Bklyn Parents for Peace <>Bklyn Society for Ethical Culture, Ethical Action Cttee.
<>Ctr. for Anti-Violence Ed.
<>Ctr. for Constitutional Rights
<>Central Bklyn Indep. Democrats
<>Chhaya CDC
<>City College Coal. Against the War
<>Coal. for the Human Rts. of Immigrants <>Coal. Of Pakistani Organizations <>Columbia University People for Peace <>Coney Island Avenue Project <>Council on American-Islamic Relations <>CUNY Is Our Future <>December 12th Movement <>Democratic Socialists of America, NYC Local <>Desis Rising Up & Moving<>Eugene Lang Student Union <>Faith Health NY <>Federation of Association of Pakistani Americans <>Fellowship of Reconciliation, 15th St.
<>Fifth Ave. Cttee.
<>Flatbush Peace Action
<>Freedom Road Socialist Organization
<>Green Party: Kings Co. & Park Slope chapters <>Ground Zero For Peace <>Haiti Support Network <>Help & Hope <>Humanist Society of Metropolitan New York <>Intl. Action Ctr.
<>International Association Against Torture <>Intl. Socialist Org.
<>Islamic Center of Bay Ridge Islamic Mission of America <>Jews for Racial & Econ. Justice <>Lesbian Herstory Archives <>Mecci Mosque <>Met. Council on Housing <>Natl. Korean American Serv. & Ed. Consortium <>Natl. Lawyers Guild <>Natl. Lawyers Guild–NYC Chap.
<>National Organization for Women
<>NJ Indep. Alliance
<>NY Coal. for Peace & Justice
<>NY Immigration Coal.
<>NYC AIDS Housing Network
<>New Yorkers Say No to War
<>Nicaragua Solidarity Network
<>Northwest Bronx Support Cttee. For the Homeless <>Not In Our Name <>October 22nd Cttee.
<>Pakistani Community Center
<>Pakistan League of America
<>Pakistani American Federation of NY
<>Palestine Aid Society
<>Palestine Ed. Cttee.
<>Prison Moratorium Proj.
<>Prospect Lefferts Voices for Peace & Justice <>Puerto Rican Legal Defense & Ed. Fund <>Refuse & Resist <>Students for a Free Society <>Theater of the Oppressed Laboratory <>VEER Grassroots Serv.
<>Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Clarence Fitch Chap.
<>War Is Not the Answer
<>War Resisters League
<>Women for Afghan Women
<>Women’s Intl. League For Peace & Freedom, NY Metro Branch <>Workers Democracy Network <>Working Families Party, Bklyn Waterfront Club <>World Peace 911 <>Rev. Elizabeth Alexander, Church of Gethsemane <>City Councilman Charles Baron <>Rev. Elizabeth Braddon, Park Slope United Methodist Church <>Dennis Brutus, S. African poet & activist <>Rev. Khader El-Yateem, Salam Arabic Lutheran Church <>Rabbi Michael Feinberg <>Abdeen Jabara, Exec. Bd., Ctr. for Constitutional Rights <>Rev. Peter Laarman, Sr. Minister, Judson Memorial Church <>City Councilman John Liu <>City Councilmember Margarita Lopez <>Rev. Paul Smith, First Presbyterian Church <>Jane Sweeney, Governing Bd., Citizen Action NYC; Exec. Cttee., Village Indep. Democrats.*

*Position shown for ID only; no organizational endorsement implied.

“For me America was the dreamland. I used to think that I was lucky to live in a liberal and democratic country. But the dreamland became hell for me after September 11.”  –Muffed Khan, a deported Pakistani (Human Rights Watch, August 14, 2002, <http://hrw.org/reports/2002/us911/&gt; )

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